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Freedom of speech in a ‘master-servant’ relationship

This article was originally published in the Law Society of NSW Journal (Issue 56, June 2019). 

Despite recent attention, the law surrounding discipline of an employee by their employer for the publication of controversial opinions has not changed.

Over recent years, the framework of employment laws has been challenged by changes in the way work has been performed. The emergence of the ‘gig’ economy in particular has marginalised the traditional employment paradigm.

Archaic language to describe the employment relationship, such as ‘Master and Servant’ and a contract of service, is a reminder that an employee must comply with an employer’s reasonable and lawful instructions.

To view Jack’s article in full, click the ‘Download PDF’ button to the right.


This article was originally published in the Law Society of NSW Journal (Issue 56, June 2019). The publication can be accessed in full on the LSJ website here.  


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Employment and Labour

The content of this publication is for reference purposes only. It is current at the date of publication. This content does not constitute legal advice and should not be relied upon as such. Legal advice about your specific circumstances should always be obtained before taking any action based on this publication.

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